FAQs

Who are your clients?
How much does editing cost?
Does WiP publish books?
What are the different types of editing?
How can I learn more about the publishing process?
Where can I learn about agents and publishers?
How can I learn more about writing a book proposal?
What kind of material should I send you first?
How should I format my manuscript?

Who are your clients?

Our clients range from unpublished authors to seasoned writers. They come to us through word-of-mouth referrals, in response to our Web site, through agents and editors who respect our work and judgment, and from publishers who ask us to edit manuscripts they’ve acquired that require special attention.

How much does editing cost?

Each WiP editor has his or her own working method and fee structure. When you contact one or more of us, we will tell you what services we think might benefit you and your project and what the rates are for those services.

Does WiP publish books?

No. WiP’s editors work with you to make your project publishable. We provide expert advice about all aspects of the publishing business, and when appropriate, help you find the right approach to agents and in-house editors.

What are the different types of editing?

Developmental and substantive editing take the broadest possible view of a proposal or manuscript, assessing its quality of thought and evaluating how well the author has achieved his or her aims. For fiction this means examining whole narratives and individual scenes in terms of plot, theme, structure, pacing, character, voice, point of view, and more. In nonfiction it includes determining how well the material is organized, whether the book’s argument is clear and convincing, and whether the presentation appeals to its target audience.

Line editing is the word-by-word and sentence-by-sentence revision of a manuscript. The line editor queries the author on issues of clarity, points of fact, and inconsistencies; insures that all sentences are smooth and clear; and makes changes wherever necessary. This kind of editing can range from making an occasional change to making substantial revisions to reworking the entire manuscript.

Copy editing is the final stage of editorial work before hard copy and/or electronic files are put into production. This includes making sure sentences and paragraphs conform to accepted rules of grammar, style, diction, usage, spelling, and punctuation, and marking the manuscript pages so the format intended by the author and publisher is accurately presented in the finished book.

Once one of WiP’s editors has reviewed your work, he or she will be able to tell you which type(s) of editing would be most appropriate.

How can I learn more about the publishing process?

The publishing business—like every business—has its own practices and conventions. There are many books that provide information about the process, but for the most reliable and up-to-date information, it’s best to consult established insiders such as those at Words into Print.

Where can I learn about agents and publishers?

The best source for basic information on agents and publishers—names, addresses, preferences, and procedures—is Literary Market Place (LMP). Most libraries have a copy available for reference. Literarymarketplace.com also provides some (although not all) of the information in the book. For good background information and insight into publishing, we recommend Jeff Herman’s Guide to Book Publishers, Editors, & Literary Agents.

How can I learn more about writing a book proposal?

There are many books that provide dos and don’ts for proposals, but top agents and publishers have different ideas about the best way to structure a proposal. For that reason, it’s best to work with an independent editor who can help you determine the most appropriate way to present your project.

What kind of material should I send you first?

Please send us an e-mail with a brief summary of your book (a paragraph or two), and some information about your background. We’ll let you know if we’re interested in your project and, if so, what additional information or material we’d like to see.

How should I format my manuscript?

If one of our editors asks you to send a manuscript for his or her review, we recommend that you print it in 12-point Times Roman type, double spaced on single sides of 8½-by-11-inch paper, and that the pages be consecutively numbered from start to finish (not chapter-by-chapter). The first page of the manuscript should include the title of the book, your name, address, phone number, and e-mail address. Consult your editor if you are sending a CD.